What is 100 Global Champions?

In today’s interconnected world, the international success of the Canadian businesses will drive the country’s future prosperity.

Having rapidly grown out of Aeroplan, to a global data-driven marketing and loyalty analytics company with 3,200 employees in 17 countries, Aimia’s experience in ‘going global’ is ongoing.

Guided by this experience, Aimia wants to support other Canadian companies’ growth by initiating a conversation on Canadian global business ambition. Aimia’s goal is to work collaboratively to inspire the next generation of leading global companies – 100 Global Champions – that are the best in the world at what they do.

To inform this conversation, Aimia commissioned research surveying almost 350 companies with at least 50 employees to understand how companies perceive major motivations and deterrents to going global, and assess pain points that companies have encountered.

Findings show that a global strategy has paid off for almost every Canadian company surveyed. However, the majority of Canadian companies that aren’t considering going global don’t have a desire or see any benefits of global expansion.

Canadian businesses need to create a culture and community with an ambitious, outward-looking global mindset, and collectively support those that are not yet global to recognize and achieve the benefits of international business.

Now is the time to foster a generation of business leaders that look beyond borders and dream of being the best in the world in what they do.

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Latest News

All the world’s a stage: How to successfully take your company global
By Rupert Duchesne
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Sep. 08, 2016

It’s time to take your company global. Or is it? A recent Aimia survey of business leaders found that half of companies considering expanding into a new country didn’t know how to determine if their company was ready.

Pourquoi les entreprises canadiennes ont-elles peur de l’étranger?
By Jean-Philippe Cipriani
L'Actualité
Published Tuesday, June 07, 2016

While the sales of Cirque du Soleil, Rona and St-Hubert have been quite prominent in Quebec, acquisitions made by Saputo, Couche-Tard or Cominar have slipped under the radar. But first, in order to play in the global big leagues, companies need to prove themselves abroad.

Why are Canadian companies so afraid to go global?
By Sarah Niedoba
Canadian Business
Published Tuesday, June 07, 2016
According to a recent study by Aimia Inc., 80% of mid-sized Canadian companies feel their businesses are “not well-suited” to international expansion. Yet it might be time for those businesses to take a note from their peers who decided to go global—90% of companies who made the move have said that it was a success.

Pourquoi des sociétés craignent-elles de jouer sur l'échiquier mondial?
By François Normand
Les Affaires
Published Tuesday, June 07, 2016 6:22AM EDT

Not enough Canadian companies are expanding beyond North America. This situation is due to the lack of ambition of their leaders and to the barriers that companies with dreams of global expansion are facing.

100 Canadian global champions. Why not?
By Rupert Duchesne
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jun. 05, 2015 4:59PM EDT

Over the past few weeks, several business leaders have shared their thoughts on what government can do differently to help Canadian business succeed. With the global economy starting to show signs of resumed growth, and an impending federal election, now is the time to have such thoughtful dialogue.